On Everything And Nothing

Jeanne

O’ Periodical, thy smite us with thy very presence. Time is against me this week, thanks to production on Periodical, and while there’s plenty of content on the site I would have liked for there to have been more. So, here’s a fleeting round-up.

Theatrically it’s a strong weekend. I caught You’re Next last week, and while it didn’t impress me enough to binge on a 700 word review, it is very enjoyable. An extensive examination of the evolving reach of what-once-was-Mumblecore forms a major section of our year end Periodical actually, and on this point there’s a nice bit of crossover between You’re Next and another of this week’s big releases, Shane Carruth’s Upstream Color, in the form of actress Amy Seimetz. As with You’re Next, I caught Carruth’s film some time ago, but unlike the aforementioned movie Upstream Color is one I’d very much like to bang the drum for. In short, it’s remarkable, and a really engaging and unusual picture. Carruth fuses everything from The Conversation and Dr. Mabuse to great effect, and wholly unique results. And fret not, for further and more detailed musings will feature in the eventual Periodical #4.

Michael Bay’s Pain & Gain is also released this week. I’m yet to see it, but will do, if not only to place the fascinating discourse that is doing the rounds in to perspective. Some writers of whom I think very highly have written very persuasive arguments for the picture. I’m keen to see where I sit. Keep an eye on Twitter over the weekend for my reaction.

amy-seimetz-shane-carruth-upstream-color

It was mentioned in this week’s Monday Blu(e)s and DVD entry for Simon Killer that a larger review was in the pipeline. I had expected to take this to full article, however, such was the impressiveness of Antonio Campos picture that yes, you’ve guessed it, a larger piece is going to be in Periodical #4. I’ve also checked out the new Time Bandits Blu-ray since writing that earlier article, and can confirm that it’s a very solid disc. This doesn’t really need saying, but the film itself still holds up really well.

This current drought will soon lift: planning for our time at the London Film Festival is currently underway with press shows beginning in just over three weeks time. They coincide with the first part of the A Nos Amours Chantal Akerman retrospective. We’ll be reporting from that (Akerman plays a big part in our Autumn/Winter plans).

One last thing. The Cambridge Picturehouse faces a very real threat of closure, thanks to competition laws (in reference to their recent acquisition by Cineworld) I’ve written a bit for them in the past, and the organisation itself is fantastic (they’re real purveyors of 70mm), so I thought it apt to pass on this petition requesting that the situation be reconsidered. Oh, and it turns out I jumped the gun on the Philip French tribute. His final reviews are in this weekend’s Observer. I can’t wait to see what he made of Upstream Color.

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